Membrane Technology Forum
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Membrane Technology Forum
Register Today!


Membrane Technology Forum

Mike Molitor
Process Pilot Plant Manager, UW-Madison Center for Dairy Research

Mike earned a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Platteville and worked 18 years for dairy manufacturers prior to joining Wisconsin CDR in 2006 as their Process pilot plant manager. In total, Mike has over 25 years of experience leading R&D and process equipment, improvement activities.

 

Forward Osmosis Versus Reverse Osmosis

The purpose of this abstract is analyze recycling dairy process effluent water by comparison of reverse osmosis to forward osmosis systems. Most dairy food processing operations are limited on water influent and effluent volume. Thus, there is a desire to improve water utilization within all forms of dairy operations. This can be accomplished through applying less demand on the water balance by way of effluent water recycling. The primary challenge of reusing dairy effluent water centers around high levels of suspended solids and dissolved organics. TSS and organics are problematic challenges for traditional reverse osmosis systems. Simply, the high pumping pressure of the system pushes solids into the structure of the membranes such that they cannot be efficiently rejected or removed. Forward osmosis is a low-pressure process derived from natural osmosis to purify water. FO utilizes a brine of high mineral concentration on one side of a semipermeable membrane to naturally pull pure water across the membrane into the brine. FO systems are far less prone to physical fouling due to the lower pressure gradient across the membranes. The viability of these technologies as potential dairy water recycling solutions depend on the operational costs compared to the capital equipment costs.

 

Part 1. Ultrafiltration to Produce Heat Stable WPI. Part 2. Soluble Casein Concentrate for Extreme Cheese Yield

At last year’s forum our preliminary results were shared regarding research to make heat stable whey protein isolate (WPI) without utilizing microfiltration. UF and electrodialysis have been utilized to demineralize wpc, which allows for effective sedimentation of the fat and denatured protein in one step before completing the final UF step and spray drying. All other whey isolate production currently utilizes microfiltration. For several years, the UW Center for Dairy Research (CDR) has been conducting milk Microfiltration research. Our most recent milk MF research has generated soluble casein concentrate for the purpose of producing natural cheeses with extremely high yields. The CDR is well equipped to conduct research using large scale, processing equipment to fractionate, concentrate and then spray dry or utilize as fluid ingredients, dairy protein products with unique composition and functionality. CDR has the staff and infrastructure resources to utilize those protein products in consumer product applications and to evaluate the range of analytical, physical and sensory attributes. CDR staff routinely present at industry conferences across the nation including to co-host the International Cheese Expo. Additionally, CDR offers multiple dairy short courses that cover are range of dairy manufacturing topics.


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