Dairy Processor News
WASHINGTON

Dairy leaders ask Senate to cut milk supply limits from farm bill

April 24, 2012
/ Print / Reprints /
ShareMore
/ Text Size+

By the International Dairy Foods Association

Washington, D.C. – April 24, 2012. Dairy industry leaders today called for theSenate Agriculture Committee to remove a new dairy program that is designed to control milk prices from the draft 2012 Farm Bill and instead focus on providing proven safety-net programs, such as revenue insurance, typically used for other commodities. Miriam Erickson Brown, president and CEO of Anderson Erickson Dairy; Jon Davis, president and CEO of Davisco Foods International, Inc.; and David Ahlem, vice president of dairy procurement and policy for Hilmar Cheese Company, Inc., held a press briefing before heading to Capitol Hill for scheduled meetings with committee members.

The dairy leaders join the International Dairy Foods Association in opposing the milk supply management program, called Dairy Market Stabilization, included in Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow’s (D-MI) mark of the 2012 Farm Bill, released on Friday. They believe this program, first introduced in H.R. 3062, the Dairy Security Act, by Rep. Collin Peterson (D-MN), will raise consumer prices, hurt exports, cost thousands of new jobs and stifle investments in new facilities.

“These three companies employ hundreds and have invested millions of dollars into the dairy industry, contributing to the economic recovery of the nation’s economy,” said Jerry Slominski, IDFA senior vice president for legislative and economic affairs. “Congress has been told that they can attempt to control milk supply and demand without harming consumers and the overall dairy industry, and that is simply not true.”

Erickson Brown reinforced the consequences of implementing the Dairy Security Act. “This proposed plan will create a chain of events which will limit the milk supply for dairies like AE and result in higher milk prices for consumers,” she said. “Last year, milk prices increased nationally on average by 11 percent, driving consumers to purchase fewer gallons of milk. A gallon of milk is the foundation for most dairies like ours.”

Dairy exports account for nearly two-thirds of recent dairy industry growth – up nearly $3 billion since 2000. In 2011 alone, U.S. dairy exports set record highs, jumping 13 percent in volume and gaining more than 20 percent in value. The U.S. Department of Agriculture job forecasts also clearly suggest this growth benefits jobs, too. In 2011, the USDA estimated that 8,400 jobs are created for every $1 billion increase in agriculture exports.

Davisco's Davis said, “"We are a family business that both produces and buys a whole lot of milk. The Dairy Security Act intends to limit the production of that milk in order to try and manipulate the price of milk. In doing so, the act will limit our ability to increase our sales opportunities all around the world.”

“Hilmar has invested millions of dollars to take advantage of the growing international demand for dairy,” said Ahlem of Hilmar Cheese Company. “In the past five years, our export volumes have increased significantly. Over the last two years, we have nearly doubled the capacity of our plant in Dalhart, Texas—a growing dairy region—adding new production lines and adding 150 new jobs.”

An audio recording of the event will be posted to www.idfa.org after 5:00 p.m. today.

Statement of Jerry Slominski

Statement of Miriam Erickson Brown

Statement of Jon Davis

 Statement of David Ahlem

SOURCE :International Dairy Foods Association

Did you enjoy this article? Click here to subscribe to Dairy Foods Magazine. 
You must login or register in order to post a comment.

Multimedia

Videos

Image Galleries

Agropur, Natrel Division USA, St. Paul, Minn.

 At its Natrel Division plant in St. Paul, Minn, Agropur makes rBST-free white and flavored milk, heavy whipping cream, half n half, buttermilk, organic milk, nutritional drinks and shakes and sport drinks. Nondairy beverages (soy, rice, coconut, and almond) coffee creamers, broth and sauces. 

BehindtheScenes

This photo gallery contains additional, unpublished photos of dairy processing facilities featured in Dairy Foods magazine. To view more Behind the Scenes galleries go to our archives page!

6/19/14 2:00 pm EDT

Build a Better Cheese

On Demand Professor John A. Lucey of the University of Wisconsin, Madison will cover defects in cheese, improving yield with processing techniques to get the most from the ingredients you've paid for, the regulatory scene, and the future.

Ice Cream

What’s your favorite way to eat ice cream?
View Results Poll Archive

Dairy Foods Magazine

dairy foods july 2014

2014 July

Read the 2014 Buyers Guide and Sourcebook, your one source for ingredients, equipment and packaging.

Table Of Contents Subscribe

THE DAIRY FOODS STORE

tharp-and-young-on-icecream.gif
Tharp & Young on Ice Cream: An Encyclopedic Guide to Ice Cream Science and Technology

An at once an all-inclusive guide to the meaning of hundreds of technical terms and ideas needed for ice cream manufacturing, as well as a practical introduction to the ingredients, freezing methods, flavoring, and packaging of ice cream, sherbet, sorbet, gelato, frozen yogurts, novelties and many other kinds of frozen desserts.

More Products

Clear Seas Research

Clear Seas ResearchWith access to over one million professionals and more than 60 industry-specific publications, Clear Seas Research offers relevant insights from those who know your industry best. Let us customize a market research solution that exceeds your marketing goals.

Dairy Foods Buyers Guide

cover df july 2013Resource for buyers in the dairy processing industry to find information on the leading suppliers and manufacturers.

Find Ingredients, Equipment, Distribution, R&D and More.

Start Your Search Today.

STAY CONNECTED

Facebook logo 40px 2-12-13 Twitter logo 40px 2-12-13  YouTube logo 40px 2-12-13  LinkedIn logo 40px 2-12-13google plus